Different Types of Business Lawsuits

The customer – business relationship is all about trust and confidence. The customer should put their trust in the business. There is a give and take relationship here. The bad news is that some businesses break the trust that customers gave them. If that breach of confidence ends up hurting the customer, they have no recourse but to sue the company.

According to the website of Slater Pugh Ltd. LLP, there are several options that a business can consider when defending their rights as a company. The courtroom is not the only venue where they could settle a legal battle. Let us take a look at these legal alternatives:

Civil Litigation

A civil litigation is uniform and regulated by Federal or state court. Filing a case can be tasking even if it does not go into trial. The processes may include filing a complaint, pleading, counterclaims, or third party action.

Small Claims Court

Small claim courts are informal courts that handle minor cases ranging from nuisance charges to money disputes. This is the first court where litigation takes place for small financial damages.

Class Action Suit

A class action suit is designed to consolidate several smaller cases into one large lawsuit. The cases involved here can be anything from toxic waste disposal to securities fraud.

Alternative Dispute Resolution

Alternative dispute resolution involves both arbitration and mediation. This is the best alternative for resolving conflicts and if you want to reduce the cost and time and avoid litigation.

Lawsuits can be time consuming and can waste your money and other resources. These alternatives can be considered for settling any conflicts and to prevent going to court. As a business, it is best to understand all your legal options. Knowledge of these different courts can help you determine the best legal alternative for your business.

Court Reporting: Basic Facts about an Essential Part of Litigation

The litigation process relies on the support of many key players to ensure a successful trial. One of these important roles is filled by court reporters. With the help of a court reporter, the court can ensure that important legal proceedings are well-documented and accounted for.

Basically, a court reporter is tasked to transcribe and create official reports of court hearings, depositions, and other similar proceedings. While it may sound like a simple task, court reporting is an important part of the litigation process. After all, documentation is essential to the entire judicial system. Every moment of a trial or court hearing needs to be transcribed and recorded for future reference. Aside from that, court reporting can also help lawyers with documenting depositions and build stronger cases. With a certified record of a testimony, lawyers can countercheck for any contradicting statements as they move on with arranging their case.

According to the website of Houston court reporters at Stratos Legal, a court reporter’s essential tool is the shorthand system. As you can imagine, legal proceedings can take a really long time, and court reporters will have to note down as much as 200 words every minute. The shorthand system allows a court reporter to follow every step of the proceeding by using symbols and abbreviations in place of lengthy sentences and phrases. Court reporters typically use a special kind of typewriter called a stenotype to make their task a lot easier.

Certain advancements in technology also contributed to the improvement of court reporting and litigation support. For example, there are court reporting services that have online repositories so transcripts can be easily accessed online. There are also some that offer digital videography. Video documentation is especially helpful for depositions complicated by geographical issues.