Innovation Can Save Our Air

The cost of living in industrial areas is extensive. Although many assume the worst parts of living in such places can be the smell or the crime rate or the lack of good schools and housing options, the greatest risk is actually the air itself. If factories are not up to code, industrial exhaust can lead to all sorts of health problems.

These problems can be slight or serious, from asthma to chronic bronchitis, to early aging, emphysema, and even death.

Though it may often be assumed that pollution is a third-world issue, it is actually a very real problem in America. MIT has calculated that 200,000 lives end earlier than they otherwise would every year due simply to air pollution.

Such high figures, and such horrible health problems, can lead to a sense of despair, especially for those located in those heavily industrialized areas. What can be done to reduce these issues?

The answer, as it always is, is innovation. America’s pollution problems have decreased massively over the last few decades because of innovation in the automotive and industrial industries. A continued push for such innovation is sure to find further answers that allow an industry to exist side-by-side with healthy communities.

Many new inventions are already showing great promise. Robovent claims to have already improved over 100,000 lives and says it will help 10,000 more every year. That business works with industries such as welding to clean up their exhaust and thus lower a number of harmful particles entering the air.

Stories like that of the Robovent (a company that says it is very passionate about its mission to clean the air) suggests a number of solutions are just over the horizon.

What is required now is an investment. That investment can and should take several forms, from philanthropists to business investors, to government loans. That last option is particularly crucial. Though some Obama-era investments were derided for their failures, the overall approach of investing in new technological innovations was a sound one, and one that should be encouraged on a bipartisan basis. In this heavily partisan era, one thing all can agree upon is the need for America to be at the forefront of the generation of technological inventions. With much of the world eager to clean the air, particularly in heavily polluted countries like China and India, the potential future profits for companies and the nation should be large enough to convince any skeptical parties that investment is needed and needed now.

Should that investment come, in all its forms, the future looks far brighter for those industrial communities. Cleaner air may be just around the corner. It just takes a few visionary inventors, and a few other visionary investors, to bring it to America, and to the world.